Review: Ready Project Tactical Backpack 72 Hour Survival Kit

This 72 hour pack put together by Ready Project is designed to offer a variety of food, water, medical supplies, and more for a single person.

Loaded with all the gear they include this pack is under 20 lbs. I really love this Molle Style Pack!

The pack measures: 9”L x 10”W 17”H

Actually, about 1/3 of the cost of this whole package deal is that pack itself. It is a quality Rothco Medium Transport Pack and I just love to use it to carry things around our property. It is big enough for a Chromebook and has so many pockets for storage organization.

As a bug out bag, this would be great for those that want to stay organized and stick to a lightweight pack. Kids could carry this pack as well due to the size and it has fully adjustable shoulder straps and a belt so it can be secured with ease. The zippers are heavy duty.

I cannot stand getting what looks like a good pack only to see that the zippers are not made to take a heavy load for an extended period of time. I think this pack could have 50 lbs in it and still be as comfortable as could be expected when carrying that type of weight. The straps are wide enough to never be at risk of digging into your shoulders. I like that the back is fully padded and mesh so you don’t get soggy when out on a long patrol

Food and Water

Emergency 72 hour Meals food and water

Meals Included

  • Brown Sugar & Cinnamon Oatmeal (10 servings)
  • Hearty Potato Stew (10 servings)
  • Savory Black Beans & Rice (10 Servings)
  • 400 calorie Apple Cinnamon Mini Meal Bar

Orange Drink Mix (10 Servings)

This is basically just a big thing of Tang. It is nice to have something to flavor your water with and add some Vitamin A and C. Remember that just because you are filtering your water to rid it of bacteria, it doesn’t mean it is going to taste like the pristine stuff you are used to having. Flavored drink mix can mask any off flavors even if you use just a little bit.

If you use the orange drink mix, make sure to only add it to water you have squeezed it through the included water filter bottle and into your cup. Trying to filter orange drink or anything besides water through your filter will ruin it very fast!

Lifesavers?

I am assuming that the Lifesavers are just to give you a little something sweet but it is also good to remember that if someone is diabetic or hypoglycemic that a piece of hard candy can help stabilize blood sugar levels.

Total Calories Per Day = 3,000

Combined calories of all rations and drink mix, including the Lifesavers is 3,000 calories per day for 3 days. The average person does not need that many calories per day. Since you have 9,000 calories of food you could make your food last for as long as 5 days and still be getting 1,800 calories per day.,

It is important to think about your situation and making the best use of your supplies if you have reason to believe a situation is going to last longer and you are unsure of when you can get more food.

OKO Original 1 Liter Water Filtration Bottle with Level-2 Filter

Lab tests conclude that this filter offers removal of 99.994% of e-coli, 99.9999% of cryptosporidium and giardia lamblia.

I like that this bottle is simple to use. Just fill and drink.  It is good they used a design that is suitable for elderly or disabled persons where a pump filter would be hard or impossible to use. The filter is good for about 100 gallons but if your water is not particularly turbid or dirty, it could last longer. It is BPA free and USA made so that is a major plus.

My biggest problem with the water bottle is that the flow rate is a bit slow. I had a bit of trouble drinking from it without having water leak out from around the mouthpiece.

Emergency Water In 8 Sealed Packs

I get it that water is the first line of survival but I really wouldn’t choose to have these little packets in my pack. They only add up to a liter or so. The shipping cost and weight for this just add to the expense of the pack.

I can get a liter of water for just a few dollars and keep it in my pack if I am worried about not having access to running water to use the water filter bottle that they include in this pack.

Canteen, Stove, And Fuel

You could get by short-term with this but it is definitely only feasible for use by a single person. It is a little bit annoying that there is nowhere near enough Ready Fuel gel to cook meals for 3 days.

A lot of people might assume that there is enough but I am glad that we calculated the actual amount and determined that you might have fuel for 4 meals of the total of 9 meals that you have in your kit. I suppose you could split the gel packets up but they don’t have a resealable feature so it would be cumbersome to try to use half and seal back. You don’t want this leaking on the rest of your gear or food.

I tried building a fire and using the stand as a little stove stand and it was difficult to do in a timely fashion. If you have to do this to cook then I recommend getting it down to coals and then putting the ring on it. It is a small space and it makes it hard to have everything level and get a fire going under it.

The canteen cup has no lid so boiling takes longer. It also has a tendency to slip down so far that a fire doesn’t draw well. I little bit of manipulation of the stove frame makes it fit tighter. The aluminum is easy to bend with a multi tool.

I also have to point out that I eventually tried the included fuel and was glad that I had a lighter. It seems that the included fuel must be lit with a match, lighter, etc. There are no included matches or a firestarter rod. I would not want to have found this out the hard way in a real emergency situation. I would have tried to use the magnifying glass on the compass to light the fire gel but it was too cloudy to work.

Fire gel has no flame so don’t put your hand too close checking to see if it is lit. It can be very hot but not seem like it is going from a distance.

Eton American Red Cross Clipray

The windup battery bank and cell charger/flashlight included in this kit is a good touch to an already put together for you pack. It is nice to have a little extra power when you need it. This easily clips on via the built-in carabiner so it is useful for hands-free lighting.

You can recharge the battery on cell phones, e-readers and more using this. The crank is easy to operate. During an emergency, keeping the line of communications open is important but having a little entertainment like a radio or e-reader that is easy to charge up can be a blessing.  This device is rated to produce 10 minutes of light for every minute of cranking.

The Medical Kit

The medical kit, survival knife, and compass included in your pack.

This is listed as an 81 piece medical kit and I have to say this is one of the better already put together small kits that I have seen. For starters, there is an actual trauma pack in here to stop bleeding. That is usually something that you have to add to a kit yourself.

I would add Benydryl Liqui Gels and some liqui gel Ibuprofen to the kit as well as some steri strips for closing up cuts and moderately sized wounds. They include some butterfly strips in the kit but I like to have a lot of ways to close a wound.

You do get a variety of plastic bandages, antibiotic ointment, aspirin, butterfly closures, BZK antiseptic towelettes, gauze, ibuprofen, aspirin, non aspirin tablets, gloves, a trauma pad, first aid tape, and a guide. Not bad at all for a tiny kit. The clear interior of the case makes it easy to find what you need.

The Survivor Knife

This is kind of a neat little knife in a way but I would rather have a multi-tool. It is pretty sharp out of the box and made of stainless steel. It is easy to grip due to the paracord covering on the handle. The lanyard helps make sure you don’t drop it.

It seems like it would do for a little while but it is an inexpensive made in china knife so I wouldn’t try to take on too much with it. It would work fine for gutting a fish or other food prep. It does have a sheath that you can put on your belt or attach to a pack.

Compass and Magnifying Glass

A compass and magnifying glass combo is a useful survival tool and it is good that it is included. This is just your standard plastic compass like what you will find at any camp store. It will do the job and is strong enough to sustain a few drops here and there. I did not have a chance to see if I could start a fire with it.

The Verdict

This is a good choice for someone that wants a grab and go solution for a few days if they have shelter. For actually bugging out for a few days it is lacking some major things but those things can be added for a reasonable cost.

Food Quality

The ingredients of some of the foods are pretty standard for emergency rations. I am not a big fan of artificial colors. During an emergency food is food but I would not want to eat some of this long-term.

The brown sugar and cinnamon oatmeal was actually pretty good and actually better quality than the Quaker Oats oatmeal envelopes you can fix in a microwave.

Our dog showed up when she realized there were snacks being cooked in the woods. Ruby Pearl is available for any survival dog snack testing!

What It Doesn’t Have

The following are things that I think are essential to any emergency bag but are not included in this package.

  • Tent or Emergency Shelter
  • Sleeping Bag
  • Raingear
  • Firestarter
  • Paracord
  • Multi Tool
  • Fork or spoon for stirring while cooking and eating

All of these items can be put in the bag at little cost but I feel they really need to be immediately added if you get this pack as a starter bug out bag.

Conclusion

This pack is good as a starter kit but the things I mentioned it needs will make it so that you could survive outside for a while rather than just get by for 3-4 days. I would rather have more food in the pack than all that emergency water.

I think that Ready Project should add a firestarter or some waterproof matches because it is too easy to assume that the cooking fuel is all you need if you are just buying this to stash back just in case for an emergency of 3-7 days. Adding an emergency blanket and rain suit to the pack would not add a lot to the cost and it would mean you had some protection from wet and cold conditions.

The pack has a lot of room in it for you to add other items over time and keep it organized. Once you take out the emergency water you have even more room to add gear. At this time you can get this kit in khaki or OD green if you prefer to blend into the woods more.

Where to Buy: You can order direct via this listing on the Ready Project


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  1. Where is the signaling mirrors? If they want you to be noticable you need those 75 cent mirrors that are 2″x 2″ and instead of that bulky water bottle they could have just given you a hydroblue or Sawyer water filter that can work with rubber tubes to make a straw. Without any ace bandages theirs no way to keep any injuries from moving around or getting worse such as a broken foot or twisted ankle. The other major issue I have if this is sitting in your car through seasonal shifts the food types aren’t the best options. In survival situations the oatmeal and candy will keep you alive longer-term but the candy can melt the reharden without little notice it’s been compromised. But to not even include space blankets or a tube tent is a huge oversight same with hand crank flashlights that never last. Pack extra batteries in a water tight case and a water resistant flashlight you’ll have light. Thankfully Paracord and fire starters are cheap but that to is a bad oversight to not be in this kit.

  2. I looked at the PRICE of this kit. Sorry…for the cost it is too unstocked. I got a pack (cuz I was too lazy to put one together myself for winter) for less than 1/2 the cost of this one (about $64/free shipping) and it had a rain poncho and matches in it. It did not have a knife (I added one I had around), nor something to eat with (WHAT are they thinking? Lick it out of the hot pot?) It did have an emergency blanket, but no cordage. I added a knife (cost unknown, had it around for a while) , eating utensil ($4), another package of fuel for stove ($6) and some survival “bars” in case there was no time to sit and cook ($7). Even with the additions I put in it still cost me a lot less than the one reviewed here. I should supplement the First Aid kit it contained…but I have a wonderful kit in my car, so I would just grab that and dump the contents into the back pack. (I also added 10 ziplock bags of various sizes, just in case….one marked with 1 cup mark on it so I don’t have to guess on amount of water to make one serving of food).

    The thing I find most annoying in these pre-made BOB is the food being in one huge pouch….so you have to measure out the amount you want to fix for each serving. Like I want to measure the water and powder in an emergency situation, simmer and stir….sigh. I am working on replacing the large pouches with individual serving sized cook the food in the pouch meals. (So I don’t have to wash my “pot” after I fix my meal. Another task I don’t think will be given enough attention in a bug out situation, leading to food poisoning from bits of rotted food inside the pot food was prepared in/washing pot in contaminated water)

    Like you, I find the weight of the included water a little off-putting, but I left it in the kit and would stuff the water pouches in my pockets to lighten the load on my back, if I need to hike home. Because my kit is kept in my car I am planning to replace the unused food every 2 years because it won’t be stored in optimum conditions and I don’t want to find it inedible should the time come I need to use it.

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