Current Events

Argh. Angst about the economy and the super rich.

Argh. Angst about the economy and the super rich.

Last week I read an article written by Robert Reich, the author of Aftershock: The Next Economy and America’s Future. (Which, by the way, is now available in paperback).

The gist of the article was that the super rich (which I refer to as the rich elite) no longer pay taxes. Instead, they are now part of the bigwig machine that is actually lending money to the government. They do this by purchasing treasuries and other other government backed issues – which, as you know, are basically loans to the government.

Cripes. I had never thought about it but this takes double dipping to a new level: not only do the rich elite make no tax payments but they also get an income derived from tax payments made on the backs of the working stiffs. He says:

The great irony is if America’s super rich financed the U.S. government the way they used to – by paying taxes rather than lending the government money – that long-term budget deficit would be far lower.

Getting Prepared Week 18: What if all is lost? Lessons learned from the recent tornadoes.

Getting Prepared Week 18: What if all is lost? Lessons learned from the recent tornadoes.

I am finally back home after a week long hiatus to the big city. Traffic, dirt, noise . . . yuk. Anyway, I am very thankful that I have my quiet little cottage here on San Juan island. Enough personal stuff; it is time to get back to the business of prepping.

The horrific storms sweeping through the southeast have not gone unnoticed from my place here in Washington State. As with the Japan quake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown (which, for some reason is no long newsworthy) the massive destruction to homes and the fabric of normal life are gut wrenching. I keep thinking about the folks who thought they were prepared: plenty of extra food, water, auxiliary power and cash to get by in the event of a crisis. They too lost everything.

So once I again I raise my hand and say “What happens if my home is swept away along with all of my precious preps?” Now that is one heck of question, especially since we personally (oops, here I go again with the personal stuff) have made so much progress this year in preparing our little homestead to be self-sufficient.

Below is a list of the lessons I have learned from this latest disaster in Alabama, Tennessee and other areas of the Southern United States.