The Sunday Survival Buzz – Volume 32

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Sunday Survival BuzzWelcome to this week’s Sunday Survival Buzz – a roundup of preparedness news, tips, articles and recommendations from around the web.

But first, an update on my own preps.  Wait a second – what preps?

As you may have guessed, I am currently doing a bit of traveling – vacation actually – so there is not much going on prepping wise, unless you call taking a much needed break its own special “prep”.  Now that I think about it, taking a break from the routine and what I have called the burden of truth is an important part of being ready for the next wave of crapola headed out way.

Midland Radios (1) (Custom)

I will say this:  this last week I have had time to play around with my new Midland FRS Radios and to describe them in one word?  Super! I am still putting together a short list of pros and cons to share with you so stay tuned for that.

Because of my travels, this week and next will be Sunday Survival Buzz lite.  So let’s get on with it!

Survival News Bytes & Articles from Around the Web

Worrisome levels of arsenic in rice:  This information about arsenic in rice was first revealed on September 19th which makes this old news, but still relevant and important.  I personally am still trying to wrap my arms around the ramifications of the CU study and for sure I have taken note of some of the products on the chart issued by Consumer Reports.rice

Still, Asian populations have survived on a diet heavy on rice for years with no ill effects so I just do not know what to think.  Here are the key points of the study:

  • White rice grown in Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, and Texas, which account for 76 percent of domestic rice, generally had higher levels of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic in our tests than rice samples from elsewhere.
  • Within any single brand of rice we tested, the average total and inorganic arsenic levels were always higher for brown rice than for white.
  • People who ate rice had arsenic levels that were 44 percent greater than those who had not, according to our analysis of federal health data. And certain ethnic groups were more highly affected, including Mexicans, other Hispanics, and a broad category that includes Asians.
  • Reducing arsenic in food is feasible. We examined the efforts of two food companies, including Nature’s One, trying to tackle the problem and learned about methods being used to try to reduce arsenic in products.
  • Based on these findings, our experts are asking the Food and Drug Administration to set limits for arsenic in rice products and fruit juices as a starting point.

It does appear that brown rice is the worst offender and certainly, you do know (don’t you?) that brown rice is not a good candidate for long term storage because it can turn rancid and spoil.  So for now I am going to relax and not worry until I have more time to study the matter.

From the Backdoor Survival Mailbox:

I received the following email from a reader who is an expat in Germany.

My husband and I have been trying to prep wisely and are always stymied by the fact that we currently live in Germany and may move back to the States within the next two years. Therefore, we can not pack away as much as we would like; partially because we will likely have to pay our moving costs and stockpiles of food are heavy, and not all items are easily shipped through moving companies (especially here) (I.e. propane, water, some foods, liquids, medicines).

It is frustrating. If we knew where we were moving, we could start stockpiling in the States – but if something happened before we could get back then we would be no better off.

I was just wondering if you had run into people who are transient preppers like us who might have some advice on “temporary” prepping.

I am putting this out to my readers in the hope that someone with some experience in the area will be able to provide some insight and thoughts on prepping from afar.  Ideas, anyone?

News From our Sponsor: Camping Survival

roasting coffee

Mother Earth News Fair – June 2012

Knowing I am a coffee lover, Tom at Camping Survival sent me some information about their Organic Green Coffee.  I saw a demonstration of home roasting green coffee beans while I was at the Mother Earth News Fair this summer but have not tried it myself.  This latest video from Camping Survival makes it look easy, either outdoors or indoors on a stovetop.

Roast your own coffee!

As with all of my sponsors, please pay them a visit and let them know you saw them on Backdoor Survival. Speaking of which, check out the new Sponsors page. If you know someone interested in advertising on Backdoor survival, have them drop me a line.

The Final Word

 A sign that survival and preparedness is becoming mainstream?

Imagine my surprise when I saw the book How to Survive Anything, Anywhere in the hotel gift shop near where I live.  Let me tell you, guests here are about as mainstream as you get.  I simply could not believe it.  Anyway, this is all good news if it means more citizens are awakening to the reality of our world situation.  And now I need to read the book (as if my reading list isn’t a mile long already).

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!

Gaye

Bargain Bin:  Once again, here is a listing of the top ten selling Amazon items purchased by Backdoor Survival readers during the second quarter of 2012.  It will be interesting to see what changes there are in the third quarter.  I compiled a list of the top selling items and uploaded them to a special Amazon store which you can access by clicking here. The items are shown in descending order with the top selling items shown first.

So what were the top ten items? I am a bit surprised by a few of these, but hey, the numbers do not lie.

1. Kershaw OSO Sweet Knife with Stainless-Steel Blade and Nylon Handle
2. Streamlight 73001 Nano Light Miniature Keychain LED Flashlight, Black
3. Emergency Mylar Thermal Blankets (Pack of 10)
4. iOSAT Potassium Iodide Tablets, 130 mg (14 Tablets)
5. Potable Aqua Water Treatment Tablets
6. When Things Go Boom! A Highly Practical (NO FLUFF!) Guide To What You Can Do NOW To Prepare For The Coming Chaos
7. The Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Handbook
8. 5 in 1 Survival Whistle
9. “Thin Red Line” Paracord Survival Bracelet
10. Diamond Strike on Box Matches – Large Kitchen Matches – 250 Count

 

I eat a lot of fruit (usually three whole fruits a night as a bedtime snack) and in a SHTF situation, fruits will be something I will really miss. The Freeze-Dried Fruit Favorites Combo from Emergency Essentials is something I use all year round. With the grocery store a 20 mile round trip journey, I like the thought of being able to rehydrate my own fruit, in the quantity I want, at a moments notice.

The selection includes Apple Dices, Bananas, Peaches, Pineapple Dices, Blueberries and Strawberries.

But not to be left out, there are veggies too. The deluxe supply of Freeze Dried Vegetables includes 18 #10 tins of the following veggies in various quantities: Broccoli, Cauliflower, Sweet Corn , Green Beans, Green Peppers, Green Peas, Mushrooms, Potato Dices, Spinach, and White Onions.

Want to help support Backdoor Survival?  Your purchases earn a small commission and for that I thank you!

Shop Amazon Tactical – Great Selection of Optics, Knives, Cases, Equipment

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Are you looking for some motivation to get started or stay on track with a self-reliant life? 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life, co-authored with my long time pal, George Ure, was recently launched on our websites and on Amazon. The website version is a PDF that works great on iPads, Nooks and other mobile devices. I think you will like it!




Comments

The Sunday Survival Buzz – Volume 32 — 7 Comments

  1. hi, just like to say Consumer Reports is an agenda driven organization and their reports are unreliable. Recommending things to the FDA for more regulation – that’s just great, more laws about more things by an agency that is categorically totalitarian in nature. And for the record, Lundberg Farms brown rice is a long-time organic rice producer and I’ve stored their brown rice for as long as three years without problems. If all you want is empty calories be sure to eat lots of white rice. It doesn’t spoil because there is nothing left to spoil after all the nutritive ingredients are ground off.

  2. I just question the timing of the rice report. As our crops have suffered from drought and our corn supply also deleted by ethanol production, now, suddenly the other big staple, rice, is under fire. As more and more people start storing rice away fro hard times, here comes someone trying to scare everyone away from rice.

    • In my recent research I have learned that this is not new news and in fact, this data has been around for over 10 years. So I have to ask “why now”? A bit of fear mongering, perhaps?

      I still plan to store and eat rice.

  3. I agree with James on the rice. I have bought the same brand for years, and have had it vacuum packed for as long as a year, tasted fine, no stale smell to it either. I also buy wild rice from minnesota and it’s definately organic, and expensive, but quite nutritious. Normally I mix it with another rice, as the wild rice is very filling. Here is the info if anyone is interested in obtaining some.
    http://www.mooselakewildrice.com
    the number is 1-888-574-8778.
    On the subject of roasting coffee. I’ve been roasting my own green beans for about 9 years now. my beans come from south america, and papua new ginea. If you want to know the ins and outs of roadting your own, you can go to,
    http://www.sweetmarias.com. they have tried, tested everything from beans to equipment. we used to roast on a bit larger scale, on a BBQ with a rotisserie and a special cylynder. now I use a stainless popcorn popper(whirlypop) make sure and get the stainless
    model, they handle the higher heat better, and last longer. there are temps, and times differences with each variety of bean as well.. I don’t reccomend roasting indoors, been there. and do it before you take your shower.
    As per the email for the faraway prepper in Germany,
    the only thing I might suggest is get their family involved, set up a place and coordinate that way, especially if it’ll be a couple years before you get back to the U.S. I hope some of this info helps.

  4. If I was in Europe working, not knowing when I would come back to the states,I would keep maybe 4-5 weeks of food. About half of it easy to prepare camping/hiking, high energy/protein stuff. I would really take a look at getting the best outdoor survival/camping gear I could while in Europe. You see things in Europe you never see in the states. I would get maps. When they had the volcano in Iceland, one of the last airports to shut down was Athens. Plan an escape in four different directions. Travel and met real PEOPLE. You should network with a least a few outside of the country you are in. Get out and pay attention to what is happening around you. Buy “junk” silver. Older the better. Be able to document it as antique to avoid at least some of the taxes getting it back into the US. I have seen storefronts full of this type of silver in Europe. If you want some real excitement play currency exchange with some Euros. Enjoy your stay and come back with lots of good stories.

  5. I like Merle’s comments, above, for the ex-pats in Europe.
    Actually, I am nervous for them.
    I really think before this time next year, some really big Earth changes will have hit us.
    Much of Europe could be swamp land.
    I really think people need to have picked their survival spots by now and hopefully will have relocated.

  6. Information at drmercola.com indicates the arsenic in rice is due to fertilizing with chicken manure and bedding. Recently chicken feed has been fortified with arsenic to stave off some diseases in factory farmed chickens and to give the meat a pinker color.
    Evidently, because it is grown in water, rice tends to pick up the harmful arsenic compounds and store them in the grains.

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