The Sunday Buzz

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The buzzWelcome to this week’s roundup of preparedness news, tips, articles and recommendations from around the web. But first, an update on my own preps.

This week we had a run to the off-island Costco and picked up an additional twenty pounds of coffee and ten bottles of salsa to add to our long term food storage.  One thing about salsa: add enough and even the blandest food tastes palatable.  In addition we purchased another 48 roll pack of TP and a case of Kleenex tissues.Kaito NOAA Radio

In addition to our purchases, I put our Kaito crank emergency radio emergency radio through its paces to make sure that it was working correctly.  (It worked perfectly.)  By the way, one of the reasons I mention this is that you too need to periodically test your gear to make sure you still know how to use it and even more important, it is still in good working order.

So, with that said and dispensed with, let’s get on to the Sunday Buzz.

Taxing Matters

US Federal income tax returns are due on April 17th this year.  If you are like me, you are way behind and need more time to dot the I’s and cross the t’s.  Now be warned:  there are number of shysters out there that want to charge you for filing for your extension electronically.  Don’t be a sucker.  Instead, you can file for free in minutes using the TurboTax Easy Extension web service.  Here is what it does:

  • E-file your federal extension
  • Make a payment of tax due, right from your checking or savings account
  • Print a PDF copy of the extension you e-filed
  • Log into your Easy Extension account to see when your extension has been accepted by the IRS
  • Access the forms you need to file a state extension by mail.

I just filed for my extension and it took less than five minutes.  Now if only I could find someone to pay my annual donation to the IRS for me.

The Origin of April Fool’s Day

Today is April Fool’s day and on this day people like to play practical jokes on victims who, if they fall for it, becomes an “April Fool”.  This custom is thought to have started in France during the 16th century but the British are credited with bringing it to the United States.

According to the KU Diversity Calendar:

The commonly accepted origin of April Fool’s Day involves changes in the calendar. At one time, the New Year celebration began on March 25 and ended on April 1. However, in 1582, King Charles IX adopted the Gregorian calendar and accepted the beginning of the new year as January 1. Those who refused to acknowledge the new date or simply forgot received foolish gifts and invitations to nonexistent parties. The butt of such a prank was known as a “poisson d’avril” or “April fish.”

So be careful today and don’t believe everything you see or read . . . except here of course since – and I mean this sincerely – there is no fooling around or shenanigans going on here at Backdoor Survival.

Chocolate as a Bedtime Snack?

candy chocolateAccording to Sayer Ji over on Wake Up World:

Chocolate is clearly one of the most enjoyed foods on the planet, and has one of the oldest documented histories of use going back to 1100 BC. And yet many still harbor guilt about consuming it because they associate it with “candy” and have never been exposed to the research indicating it may actually be closer to a “medicine.”

Now I personally can attest to my own physician telling me that a little bit of dark chocolate – the good stuff – each evening would be heart-healthy along with a nice glass of red wine.  As with everything in life, the key is moderation.  Here is a link to the article Chocolate: Candy or Cutting-Edge Medicine?

Bye Bye Pink Slimepink_slime

You might recall that back in February I wrote about meat glue and pink slime.  I was outraged that our grocers and restaurants were adulterating our meat without full disclosure.  Well I can now say that the matter of pink slime is pretty darn close to being yesterday’s news.  Thanks to the outcry of activists and consumers, many supermarkets and most schools are discontinuing the use of pink slime in their ground beef.

That notwithstanding, I find it interesting that Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad said:

“We take this off the market then we end up with a fatter product that’s going to cost more and is going to increase the obesity problem in this country.”

Of course what he did not say is that he (Branstad) received $150,000 in campaign contributions in 2010 from the founders of the company that makes pink slime.  To me, this is just another example of sneaky politicians telling us something is good for us when in reality, the good is only being done to their bank account.

And what about the activists such as you or I?  Here is what Activist Post had to say about that: Activism Shuts Down ‘Pink Slime’ Plants.

Today on Strategic Living

In this week’s article, George and I reflect on being on the leading/bleeding edge and all that that means.  We take a little trip down history lane and  tell you about ourselves and our early career days as well.

But the leading edge of the 70s, 80s and 90s is not the same leading edge of today. We both concur that there is trouble betting on the leading edge and today we tell you why.  Here is a link to Trouble Betting on the Leading Edge.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!

Gaye

. . . Your comments welcome here and at The Buzz.

Like this? You might also like:

From the Bargain Bin: The items featured in my Personal Pocket Survival Kit have proven to be extremely popular. In cased you missed it, here they are along with a few handy extras.

Kershaw OSO Sweet Knife:  This “oh so sweet” knife is solidly built, stainless steel knife that comes razor sharp right out of the package. It will pretty much cut through anything the price is amazing. About $23.

Streamlight Nano Light Keychain LED Flashlight:  The little guy is extremely small and light weight yet throws off a decent amount of super-bright light.  At just .36 ounces and 1.47 inches long, the Streamlight Nano Light Keychain Flashlight will take up a minimum of space in your pocket or bag. About $7.

Paracord Survival Bracelet:  Why a Paracord Bracelet? So you always have some of this useful cord on your person!  About $7.

Windstorm Safety Whistle:  This particular whistle can be heard a long distance away and above howling wind and other competing sounds. About $7.0

Swedish Firesteel:  Using this basic pocket fire-starter, you can get a nice fire going under almost any conditions. This is a small, compact version. About $11.

Pepper Spray:  It is always good to have some form of defense that will temporarily halt a bad guy that is in your face.  About $7.

Emergency Mylar Thermal Blankets:  These come in compressed packets small enough to fit in a pocket or wallet.  You will be surprised at how warm these will keep you. About $8 for a pack of 10.

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Comments

The Sunday Buzz — 1 Comment

  1. Hello Gaye,
    Funny you should mention salsa for use in dressing up your blander food you have in storage. I have a coupel of cases of canned Italian stewed tomatoes that I use for the same purpose. When theyare added to most canned food they make it tase pretty good and the meal becomes more nutritious..

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