BDS Book Festival 7: Prepper Pete is Back

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Who would ever imagine that we would be having Christmas in February?  Well not really although todays Book Festival entry will bring memories of December right back to you in a way that is not only charming, but reminiscent of the best of the holiday season.

With that introduction, today I share the next author interview and giveaway in the Backdoor Survival Book Festival 7.  Kermit Jones is back to answer a second round of questions and to offer one lucky reader a copy of Prepper Pete’s Twelve Days of Prepper Christmas.

Prepper Pete's 12 Days of Christmas - Backdoor Survival

I just want to say that if you have children, nieces, nephews, grandchildren or even some special neighbor kids, you are going to want to get a copy of this book.  Just to give you a taste:

“On the ninth day of Prepper Christmas my true love gave to me NINE seeds a growing . . .”

Enjoy the interview and be sure to check out the details of this week’s giveaway below.

An Interview with Kermit Jones, Author of Prepper Pete’s Twelve Days of Prepper Christmas

Intro from Kermit

First off, I want to say thank you for the opportunity to participate again in the BDS Book Festival. I think the information you make available is phenomenal and the book reviews help navigate a lot of what’s available out there. It can be overwhelming and BDS really does make a difference.

What’s your message in this book that’s different from the first? What inspired you to write it?

The first book was somewhat serious (considering it’s a children’s book!). This one is nothing but fun. That said, it has a bit of a twist on it since it’s based on a true story. Bottom line is that I wanted to share with others the idea that prepping can actually be a whole lot of fun.

Two years ago is when I actually started taking preparedness seriously. Some of my extended family on my wife’s side were already very serious about the topic and so we had several conversations on strategy, best practices, what to do as a beginner, etc. Growing up, I was always the “resourceful” camper, but the area I needed help and education in was actually firearms, of which my brother-in-law is a bit of an expert. That is what spawned endless hours of questions on not only firearms, but all manner of prepping questions.

Fast forward to Christmas – we were celebrating with my wife’s sister and her family (the prepper family). When it came time to exchange gifts, they just smiled really big and disappeared into the other room. They then started singing a familiar tune but with a really big twist! For each item, they literally produced it on the spot and kept singing. It was totally amazing! (Not to mention a great deal of fun!)

Given your background, knowledge and experience, what do you feel are the three most important survival or prepping skills?

Wow. Only three? That’s tougher than it sounds, and honestly think it depends on the category. There are skills like procuring safe water to drink, food to eat, making fire, etc. And then there are skills like critical thinking, staying calm and clear under difficult situations, etc. In all honesty, one skillset can’t survive without the other, and a person can’t survive without both.

That said, if I stick to “traditional skills,” I would probably say fire, shelter, and food. But my application of them might be cheating a bit.

Fire is a huge morale boost, and it enables safe water, warmth, and a hot meal. You need to know how to make it, tend it, and maintain it. That has to be balanced, however, with the fact that it can give away your position or draw unwelcomed visitors, both four and two-legged.

Shelter is a dual purpose in that it protects you from the environment and it can provide physical security, both of which are essential. I’m always looking at the surrounding environment and thinking of options. I’m a huge fan of earthbagbuilding.com, survival shelters, etc. And it’s highly dependent on your situation. Are you in the woods, grasslands, snow, or mountains? Each of those poses advantages and disadvantages and one would be foolish to not take the differences into account and learn according to location.

Food. Well, what can I say other than I’m a growing boy? Seriously, though, as a father of four young children, filling bellies is fairly high on my list. Food should include growing, preserving, trapping, hunting, scavenging, etc. No parent wants to be a position where they can’t provide, and looking them eye when they’re hungry is more painful than words can describe.

What would you purchase if you only had $500 to spend on preparedness supplies?

That answer depends on whether you’re speaking from where I’m at or what I’d recommend to a newcomer. I think number one on the list would be a copy of the “Twelve Days of Prepper Christmas” and the entire Prepper Pete Series! [wink wink]

In all seriousness, though, the song (and hence the book) covers, or better yet, represents, a wide range of prepping topics. Fire, food, water, shelter, communication, protection… they’re all in there, albeit in small quantities. But for about $150, someone get started (or help someone get started) and they could literally buy everything in the song. It just so happens that all of the items fit neatly in the Luggable Loo, too!

I would build on it quite a bit, however, and even add a few things. I would get a couple of really good books that teach prepping strategy and step-by-step skills, a good knife, and I think a firearm of some sort would be essential for both food and protection. Surprisingly, those could all be had in one variation or another for under $500.00.

To what extent does your family participate in your personal preparedness efforts?

The fun part about having children while writing children’s books is that I have an endless supply of ideas coming in! And it’s very helpful to ask questions and attempt to understand the world of prepping through their eyes by teaching them something and then asking questions. But I would definitely say they are engaged, and I’m thankful for it!

What is your favorite survival or prepping book? (It can be fiction or non-fiction.)

Again, tough call. It might be easier if you made me pick fiction or non-fiction! From a non-fiction perspective, I would have to go with “How to Survive TEOTWAWKI ” by James Wesley Rawles, if only because he does a very good job between balancing the billion options out there with ideas on how to approach the topic practically. I helped me early on with categorizing the priorities I need to have.

Do you have anything else that you would like to share with the readers on Backdoor Survival?

I’m happy to say that the “Prepper Pete” series is going very well, though I wish I had more time to dedicate to it. “The Twelve Days of Prepper Christmas” was the second book in the series and two more have been released since then. There has been extremely positive feedback from readers and fans, for which I am grateful, and I’m always looking for partnerships to promote preparedness when it comes to the topics of kids.

I would ask that parents recognize how amazing their kids really are. They understand quite a bit, and they can often take in more than we think. That said, I always caution that maturity level is key, and the topic of prepping can always be approached from a positive perspective. Don’t scare… prepare!

It’s like Prepper Pete always says: “Some people prepare because they are afraid. Our family doesn’t have to be afraid… because we are prepared!”

The Book Giveaway

A copy of Prepper Pete’s Twelve Days of Prepper Christmas has been reserved for one lucky reader.  To enter the giveaway, you need to utilize the Rafflecopter form below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The deadline is 6:00 PM Pacific next Tuesday with the winner notified by email and announced on the Rafflecopter in the article.  Please note that the winner must claim their book within 48 hours or an alternate will be selected.

The Final Word

Am I crazy for waiting until February to post this giveaway?  Of course not.  The spirit of the holiday season lives all year long in our hearts.  What better way to prepare for 2015?

Good luck, everyone!

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!
Gaye

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Spotlight:  Prepper Pete’s Twelve Days of Prepper Christmas

Another original Prepper book for kids! Prepper Pete works very hard to keep his loved ones safe by preparing for events that may happen in the future. His family decides to thank him by giving gifts based on a longstanding tradition… with a Prepper twist! Children (and you’re whole family!) will love singing this adapted version of a well-known classic!

Note:  Teaching kids the importance of being prepared doesn’t have to be harsh or scary. Regardless of why you (or someone you may know) prepare, remember that the single most important thing you can teach your kids is how to think!  All the preps in the world don’t mean a thing if people don’t know how to think clearly.

Teach useful skills to all of the kids you know, to include critical thinking, problem solving, and the most important one of all – how to be resourceful!

Bargain Bin:  For your convenience, here is a list of all of the books in the current Backdoor Survival Book Festival.

Book Festival 7 – Non-Fiction

The Ultimate Situational Survival Guide
The Practical Preppers Complete Guide to Disaster Preparedness
The Art of Eating through the Zombie Apocalypse
Developing a Personal Preparedness Plan
Survival Guns: A Beginner’s Guide
5 Acres & A Dream
Ultimate Dehydrator Cookbook
Preppers: History and the Cultural Phenomenon
Urban Emergency Survival Plan: Readiness Strategies for the City and Suburbs

Book Festival 7 – Fiction

Liberators: A Novel of the Coming Global Collapse
77 Days in September and Daunting Days of Winter
Good Crazy
Point of Crisis
Avalon: The Retreat and Avalon: Beyond the Retreat
Rebellion in Northwoods
Prepper Pete’s Twelve Days of Prepper Christmas
Prepper Pete’s Gun of a Son: A Gun Safety Book for Kids

Plus: The Preppers Guide to Food Storage

No list of books would be complete without my own book, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage.  The eBook is only 99 cent plus the print version is available for less than $6.00.

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Shop Emergency Essentials Sales for Fantastic Deals!

For over 25 years Emergency Essentials has been providing the highest quality preparedness products at great prices.  Plus, each month they feature sales that quite honestly are fantastic.  This month note the great sale prices two of my favorites, the Mobile Washer (Hand Operated Washing Machine) now only $14.95 and the Tote-able Toilet Seat and Lid, now only $11.79.

Preptember

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Comments

BDS Book Festival 7: Prepper Pete is Back — 22 Comments

  1. The best prepper gift at holidays when everyone is gathered together? To me that would be an open discussion of where everyone would meet or how they would attempt to communicate with one another in an emergency (short-term) or a longer-running catastrophe. This conversation could provide a natural stepping-stone to additional discussion on how prepared everyone is for various scenarios…

  2. Ahh, what a great idea instead of corporatism. I am a retired chef, I make all my gifts with a food item or something up cycled from a repurposed items obtained throughout the year.
    Kudos to you for this wonderful idea to take the pressure off of buying something people don’t need.

  3. Sharing ones time with people you care about is the best preparation of all. Getting to know and understand people be it family, friends, or neighbors is very important first step in sharing preparation thoughts and concerns.

  4. I have purchased those holiday wrapped liquid candles from Emergency Essentials, and I give them to friends and family that I know do not even have a candle in their house in case of power failure.
    I get together each Christmas Eve with my family. Everyone brings a little something to eat and I try to make something out of my long term food storage to show them how good it can be.

  5. I agree with Ruby, sharing ones time (and knowledge) with loved ones is important. One of my BILs’ thinks I am a survival nut because I have gotten serious about “having things on hand for emergencies” aka prepping and I told him, I’m getting ready for my retirement, why pay for things that I can store now and have on hand then pay for them when the price may or may not be 2-3 times more expensive and we’re on a reduced budget. I have the room, so why not. My other BIL thinks I am so smart and frugal;).DaHubs thinks I’m a bit loco but He’s not been too bad about the complaints.

  6. This sounds like a great book that gets the message across in a fun way! I think each year one could focus on a different aspect of preparation, such as one Christmas items useful for fire, another Christmas food items, next water filters, etc. I think the first year or two could be good books: on basic preps, and on medical that shows you what to do when there’s no doctor.

  7. Ok this works for Christmas, now on the ‘spring break’ and the story about the rabbit or the chicken bringing seeds to plant. 😉

  8. Every Christmas my family gets small items in their stockings for “safety” in their cars, dorm rooms, etc., such as flashlights, filter straws, emergency blankets, knives, etc. They don’t even know it’s “prepper-stuff”.

  9. I like to give functional bags or totes that can be used to organize anything or used for prepping. Sneaking in some pamphlets on prepping doesn’t hurt, especially for my friends/family who haven’t started to even thing about the topic!

  10. My grandchildren would enjoy this, and enjoy reading it to their cousins, and friends. Reading is basic, and pushed here in our home. As is stocking up,(prepping). This would make a great gift, too.

  11. Buying groceries… There R many discounted grocery s in this area… I like to pick up things I would need for the week, BUT put it in back stock

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