Summer Book Festival and Giveaway: An Encore from George Ure

Print Friendly

Today I share another interview and book giveaway in the Backdoor Survival Summer Book Festival. George Ure is back again this week for an encore interview and shares his answers to some new questions.

Now here is the deal.  The book he originally included in the Summer Book Festival was pulled from publication.  I suppose you would say it has been moth-balled.  As a conciliation, he has agreed to provide 3 of my readers with a copy of his recently revised e-book, How to Live on $10,000 a Year – Or Less.

How to Live on 10K

Before we begin, I would like to announce the winner of last week’s giveaway.

“Crista” has won a copy of Fight, Flight, or Hide. The Guide to Surviving a Mass Shooting. Congratulations! I have contacted you by email with instructions for claiming your book.  Here is how Christa answered the question “What is your favorite “survival” food?  (Or what do you THINK will be your favorite survival food?

My favorite survival food is my regular favorite food – chocolate! I have tried to store it in as many forms as possible, from Tootsie Rolls in the BOB to cocoa powder for baking!

It won’t be so much about survival as it will be psychological welfare. This is an area of prepping that needs to be addressed by all of us!

Be sure to check out the details of this week’s giveaway below.

AN  ENCORE INTERVIEW WITH GEORGE URE

1. Given your background and knowledge, what do you feel are the three most important survival or prepping skills?

It’s hard to boil down survival and prepping skills to a simple “top 3” or even a top 20. The reason is that the way the events have an unfortunate way of delivering a need for that one damn skill you don’t have.

It’s a lot like going into Lowes when you’re planning to build a house: There’s probably not a tool in there you wouldn’t use if you were really planning a “foundation up” construction project. Even the welding section has items you could use, especially if you are going to tack-weld your reinforcing steel (rebar) before you pour concrete.

So education really has a couple of components to it – and this is whether you’re talking prepping/survival or whether you’re building a house. Of course, it also applies if you’re thinking about putting yourself in hock to buy, and education, too. This is a kind of pet peeve area since jobs are so scarce and student loans can simply bury whole families.

It really comes down to defining what you (Gaye) and I would call in developing software the “Use Case.” This is where programmers and analytical types discuss with the customer exactly what they want to accomplish: What information do they need to see on a screen? How big should that font be? Does the company logo need to be on this screen? When this item is missing, does the system have error trapping and – if yes – how does that work?

Well, designing the perfect set of tools and skills for a yet-to-arrive future is difficult to assess even when everything seems to be going wrong. It’s also why Backdoor Survival and UrbanSurvival and my Peoplenomics websites are so “sympatico.”

Backdoor Survival has tons of useful “how to” articles while Urban Survival, in particular, is kind of like a “hot sheet” or “threat list” that gets updated and I try (OK, sometimes none too perfectly) to put the specific threat into words and also a number of skill sets that would be useful.

For example, if there was a lot of coastal earthquake activity (besides the Pacific Ring of Fire and New Zealand) then the skills would include timing routes to higher elevations above tsunami threats. Absent that, is there a boat handy? If there is a boat handy, is it self-righting, self-bailing, and does it have some water, oars, a sail, and so forth?

On the other hand, off at the other extreme of water, do you know how to build a condensation water supply using plastic which works even in drought struck areas?

Well, that’s the damn curse I walk around with in my head all the time and I’d be pleased to share it, but it doesn’t get the problem out of my head: I still have to read the news, figure out how the threats have shifted overnight, and then think through (as well as one can between 4 AM and 6 AM) how any of these changes will impact my choice of places, supplies, tools, food, water, energy, and so forth.

What you’ll see (if you haven’t dozed off yet) is that you really need (above all else) an appreciation for the threats and then a plan to address each.

Which leaves me one more choice, so I’ll take what’s behind Curtain #3: We’ve got Awareness and Response figured out which means the missing piece must be Balance. Given that something will eventual happen geologically to move coast lines or crumble mountains, you still need to keep your daily balance because so many of these threats could arrive in the next one minute or not for 10,000 years.

That’s where Balance matters so much. A balanced person with no skills would be a wasted human. A skilled and watchful person can flip into the nutter category in a blink, and the watcher who is thoughtful might actually need to do something someday and since the list of possible skills is long, there’s a lot of work ahead, right?

As an author in the survival and/or prepping niche, what are you personally preparing for?

We’ve preparing for “sand in the Vaseline.”

I’ve just spent several hundred dollars buying some rare books for a research project for Peoplenomics.com subscribers which I guess I can let slip out here (since only half the planet will hear about it): I’m working on a new e-book which could be anywhere from a few dozen pages to something really long and involved….you know Tolstoy in length.

Here’s the general idea: As humans have evolved, they have brought “eras” with them. Some of the “eras” which came along – and which were being extensively documented by “those old economists” that were active during the last economic Depression – involved the idea of mechanization as an era. Think of it like their version of “high tech” 100-years ago.

Back then, the places that were not tech included most of today’s third world and so forth. The US (and Germany/Europe) were able to fight their wars pretty much independently. The US had its own energy, thanks to the Rockefellers, for example, while Germany had coal and so on.

So part of what I’m doing is going back and seeing how these people were viewing “progress” of their day. That included a massive public works project, not unlike the massive effort going into CERN these days….the digging of the Panama Canal.

OK, now we fast-forward to the Great Depression and a number of these economists were still in vogue and then they started writing about the Big Change which was going to have to come from the impact of mass manufacturing and the fact that horses and other draft animals became obsolete when the traction motor (which we call the tractor) came along and when cars began to replace horses in a serious way.

Then, like now, there was much hand-wringing and cry-babying about what the future would hold. But in the last Depression, the people who made the most money were those who bought prime land and those who bought stocks when they were pennies on the dollar worth of value.

That’s what I’m planning for: A window when things will be so cheap – from the blood running in the streets (financially speaking) that even an idiot can pick up and make money.

But you need a little bit of dough when we get there, which is why we have pushed so far back from civilization to live on 20 acres of land and to try to “watch quietly” and see what we can figure out. Plus it’s a cheap life when you deliberately “de-consume” a bit and grow some of your own food.

Ultimately I think everyone walks around with a look-up table in their head: If this goes wrong then I will do that. But if this other thing over here goes wrong, then I think I’d react by doing thus-and-so.

It’s really what makes Urban/Peoplenomics and Backdoor such a good fit: We watch the threat board and you focus on how to play things.

Admittedly, I’m all over the place…but the threats change often as heck! And like this was supposed to be a reminder, as I was writing this note to you the power went off here at the ranch. 95-degrees, humid and no power…I ask you, what’s the fun in that? The fun part was Elaine coming over and saying “I see the power’s not off over here…” But the power had gone off in the house…so she was over to get me to call the power company.

A quick spin of the AM radio dial revealed it wasn’t EMP or the end of the world…but yeah, that’s the kind of thing I worry about most: We’ve become a highly electricity dependent society so having a diesel genset and solar power is the area which I’ve concentrated most on and now I’m moving my “big effort” into hydroponics this fall and winter.

Even in the short-term, a lack of water and food can kill, so I want plenty of power for the water well and lots of “reach out and touch” with the ham radio gear. And while we’re doing it, air conditioning would be nice. But the freezer which is on emergency power? Well, don’t want to lose calories unless we have to…

(I assume the power will come back on, but here I am, working…)

THE BOOK GIVEAWAY

Three copies of How to Live on $10,000 a Year – Or Less have been reserved for Backdoor Survival readers.  Here is this week’s question – and it is something I have been meaning to ask for quite some time:

What future question would you like to see answered by Backdoor Survival readers in a giveaway promotion?

To enter, respond in the comments area at the end of this article. The deadline is 6:00 AM Pacific next Friday. A winner will be selected at random using tools on the random.org website although please note, that the winners may not be notified until early October.  Once the winners are notified, they will have 48 hours to claim their e-book or an alternate winner will be selected.

Note: If you are reading this article in your email client, you must go to the Backdoor Survival website to enter this giveaway in the comments area at the bottom of the article.

summer book festival 2013_04

THE FINAL WORD

This article concludes the Summer 2013 Backdoor Survival Book Festival.  I would like to thank all of the authors and their publishers for participating and of course the readers for their entries and answers to my questions.

Coming up in October in the Fall/Winter Book Festival and once again, I have some fabulous books lined up in both the survival fiction and non-fiction genres.  There are a few surprises in store – I just know you will be pleased!

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!
Gaye

If you have not done so already, please be sure to like Backdoor Survival on Facebook to be updated every time there is an awesome new article, news byte, or free survival, prepping or homesteading book on Amazon.

In addition, when you sign up to receive email updates you will receive a free, downloadable copy of my e-book The Emergency Food Buyer’s Guide.


Bargain Bin: Listed below are all of the books in the Backdoor Survival Summer Reading List. There are both fiction and non-fiction titles and a bit of something for everyone. Also, some of these books are Kindle e-books but you do not need a Kindle to read Kindle e-books. Simply download the free Kindle app from the Amazon site and you are good to go.

owl reading book

THE BACKDOOR SURVIVAL SUMMER READING LIST – NON-FICTION

The Unofficial Hunger Games Wilderness Survival Guide
The Mini Farming Guide to Composting
Meals in a Jar: Quick and Easy, Just-Add-Water, Homemade Recipe
Fight, Flight, or Hide. The Guide to Surviving a Mass Shooting
Don’t Be A Victim!: An Officer’s Advice on Preventing Crime
Emergency Air for Shelter-in-Place Preppers and Home-Built Bunkers
Survival Medicine Handbook
Getting Home
Staying Home
Guns Across the Border: How and Why the US Government Smuggled Guns into Mexico
Spiraling Downward: Thinking About and Planning for Economic Collapse

THE BACKDOOR SURVIVAL SUMMER READING LIST – FICTION

Holding Their Own IV: The Ascent
Apocalypse Drift
299 Days: The Visitors
The Western Front (Parts 1,2,3 – The Complete Collection)
The Wayward Journey


EMERGENCY ESSENTIALS Mountain House SUPER SALE! 40-50% off all cans!

This month Emergency Essentials is having a huge sale on Mountain House Products. The selection is huge.  Not only that, for a limited time shipping is free on all orders of $150 or more.

Note: Do not be discouraged if some of your MH favorites are on backorder (mine were).  Emergency Essentials will still honor the price and ship your products to you as soon as they are back in stock.  As an example, the items I order on the 3rd arrived shipped this week.

One of my personal favorites is the Mountain House Chili Mac (shown below) which is 40% off at $15.89 for a #10 tin.  And for a snack or dessert, the Mountain House Ice Cream Sandwiches are one of the Survival Husband’s favorites.  I am more of a fruit person myself.

Mountain House Chili Mac_1 403

This is by far one of the best sales I have seen on Mountain House.  The only problem I am having is deciding how to spend my $100 Emergency Essentials budget this month!

 Shop the Emergency Essentials Monthly Specials


Like this and want more?

Follow Backdoor Survival on Facebook
Follow Backdoor Survival on Twitter
Follow Backdoor Survival on Pinterest

Need something from Amazon (and who doesn’t)? I earn a small commission from purchases made when you begin your Amazon shopping experience here. You still get great Amazon service and the price is the same, no matter what.

The Amazon Top Ten Most Wanted Survival and Outdoor Items

Help support Backdoor Survival. Purchases earn a small commission and for that I thank you!


11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life: This little book will provide you with the motivation to get started or stay on track with a self-reliant life. 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life, co-authored with my long time pal, George Ure (www.urbansurvival.com), and can purchased from Amazon.




Comments

Summer Book Festival and Giveaway: An Encore from George Ure — 68 Comments

  1. Answers to questions? I have read many websites about building a ‘faraday cage’. I cant get a definitive answer as to “do I need the cage to be hard wired to a ground”. I bought the short wave radio that George spoke of, and I have the hand crank AM/FM radio. I will only use these radios when the ‘time’ comes. I need to store each of my radios in a faraday cage, and I want to know exactly how to do this.
    I also joke with you, that you are my ‘go to girl’, and you should know that you are. You are in the top 10 survival websites, and it is your job to prepare as many people as possible. There is so much hype out there about ways to purify water, chemicals, filters, boiling, and such. I really would like you to look into purifying water with the use of “SODIS”. It looks so easy (easy peasy), and definitely cheap.

  2. How to build portable solar powered High Frequency Ham Radio rig. If the grid goes down, fuel for generators is scarce a solar powered Ham Radio would be priceless.

    • David,

      You have the wrong approach. Why re-engineer the radio when it is much easier to have solar charged backup battery power for your radio. Today’s HF radios are very suffocated and would be a major project to build from scratch. However, with a couple batteries and a solar charging system for those batteries you will be able to operate free of the power grid. A lot of the HF ham radios operates on 12 volts so the batteries are a good way to go and you don’t need a lot of output power to communicate. Check out some of the solar panels and systems to see how to do it.

  3. I would like to know different ways to preserve food without modern tech. I know people have been doing this for years and it would be a good skill to know when we don’t have all our fancy electronic powered deyhdrators and pressure cookers fuled by the electric stoves.

  4. What is the single most important personal care item to stockpile? I understand it may be different for different ages but surely there’s one can’t-do-with-out item for nearly everyone.

  5. What do you consider to be the most important items to have in a baby first aid kit? I am a great-grandma and have to rethink our stash to take care of the little one.

  6. Ir would be nice to know where to re-locate considering dangers of floods, earthquakes, and other factors that could effect survival.

  7. What future question would you like to see answered by Backdoor Survival readers in a giveaway promotion? I would like to see how to build a battery bank to store power created by solar panels ,wind turbines or water wheels. Any info on how to build home based power generation would be useful not just for SHTF but even now to cut down on household expenses.

  8. how do we produce as much food as possible in as small a space as possible. i live on a small lot and am trying to research how to produce as much food as possible from here, because here is where i am.

    thanks
    dean

  9. What is the difference between friend or foe in a survival situation? In some life or death situations how do you know who to trust?

    • when you go shopping buy 1 or more extra items bag of rice,dry beans canned good etc,recycle too.old plastic soda bottles can be cleaned and reused to store water or rice and beans.dollar stores and a preppers paradise,cheap candles ,canned good s etc these are just a few ideas

  10. I’d like some tips on how to adapt a well that has an electric pump to also have an option of working with a hand pump. I want to be able to have water when there is no electricity – whatever amount of time the electric is out.

    • on doomsday preppers a group of folks in california had a well they made a hand pump from pvc ssee if you can google/youtube the episode or do a search for pvc hand pumps

  11. What kind of wild foods can we forage? and how to prepare them in a tasty way! I’m growing purslane right now, but because it is the cultivated seed, it’s not quite as tasty as the wild purslane! Go figure! LOL!

    • we have 3 cats that we took in from our yard as feral kittens,they have become very loyal and loving house cats .we also feed anywhere from 5-10 feral/strays that visit our feeding stations.we are active in the TNR program.Trap Neuter Release. we trap with have a heart box traps,good practice for aquiring small game BTW.we take them to a low cost spay mobile and then release them back into the yard.We have no mice,rats or big bugs as a result of our cat colony

  12. If you only had x amount of time (say 30 minutes for example) and $0-$20 to spend on prepping per week, what would you do? Sometimes we don’t have a lot of money or time to prepare, but every little thing counts and doing a little is better than doing nothing at all.

  13. Most of us have concentrated on prepping for our families. I am looking for some suggestions for preparing to assist those who for various reasons can’t stockpile food and water for even short-term situations. Are there communities working on a plan to respond?

    • David, things turn black because of oxidization when i dry things like apple rings i give them a little mist of lemon juice on each side of the slice ( i lay them flat on a cookie sheet, mist them, turn them over and mist the other side) then i put them in the dehydrator. i store them in plain old plastic containers that i also use for sandwiches for school lunches. i’ve had then turn a little brown but not black. i have some just up on the shelf that i dried about a year ago, i just got my 15 yr old to try them, tasted just fine. not crispy anymore and he wasn’t thrilled with the slightly leathery texture but the taste was fine.

  14. I’d like to see each reader give some information about themselves and if/how/why they got into prepping. We are a community who know nothing about each other. Who are these people who read BackdoorSurvival.com? Are we young/old married/single rich/poor working/unemployed city-dwellers/country-folks spiritual/atheistic? Do we all have a garden and a year’s worth of gas for the generator, are we just starting to look into prepping, or are we just curious and not planning on doing any prepping? What are we prepping for, and why? Why do we read Gaye’s site?

  15. My question is: How can preppers come together for mutual aid and become a group large enough to accomplish something? A nationwide organization to influence law makers and people somewhat like the NRA or other such group. An Organizer would have to step forward. There are a lot of preppers if they unite.
    My wife and I are attempting to live on $10,000 a year and it is tough. Maybe the book could give us some help on how to do this.
    I like Kathryn’s comment at the top.” Why do you want to win this book.” Excellant idea.

  16. How do I learn to read other people as to their intent, whether they are somewhat trustworthy, and if they are lying. This is very important now and after the collapse. People are very untrustworthy and I generally shy away from them. I’ve been double crossed and stabbed in the back so much. I guess because I can’t read people and I need to know how to do this.

  17. I think all the suggested questions are outstanding. One that sticks out is more social, but if people are to work together, isn’t a social life very important…..even online ( a support group )? I understand not everyone wants to share photos or reveal their location or get too involved with people they most probably will never meet, but I think that suggestion is good. Actually it shouldn’t have to be mentioned. We’re all here, so it’s up to Gaye , if she wants to take on more work….;+)
    Dennis; I too live on just a teeny bit over 10,000. a year….and it is a challenge!
    Holly; These days, trust is difficult to find….

  18. I live on a good bit less than $10,000 a year, and I live fairly well on that. But, having grown-up “not rich”, I learned a lot of frugal tricks a long time ago. I guess the question I would most like answered is “How do I turn doubting family members into believers?” Tried all kinds of things, but I’m not having much luck. They all live paycheck to paycheck!

  19. My family is the same way Catherine. I have to remember when I was raising my girls, I didn’t think much about ….what they called “Survivalist” way of living. I was busy raising a family and taking care of the home and hubby and paying bills. My kids just think since I’m a ” granny”, and I have too much time, so I think about these sorts of things…..Old people think funny, don’t you know!! I stopped ” preaching”, as they have called my advise. I think about preparing for them, in case they can travel to be here, if something catastrophic happens. I think they will have to get older and less busy to really think about ” what-ifs”. I know one thing for sure, they will have to bring an RV or supplies to build something because there is no room in this place…..unless there is absolutely no other alternative. I could go on forever……….
    Thrift stores, dollar stores, saving pennies for things; that’s what I do I’m more prepared then most….sadly.

    • I just had to reply to this comment. I just went to my local Thrift store to buy a door for the room I am building in my basement for a root cellar/winter refrigerator. They had one with the hinges and the door knob for $5. They had just gotten in a whole truck load of 8 inch thick foam mattresses from the dorm rooms of the local collage that were incased in heavy vinyl. They were asking $29 a piece, but after chatting some, $5 a piece is I took all they could jam in my van. They could only jam in 5. I asked about bed frames, and they only had 2, for $25 a piece. I told them that those beds are bunk beds, and they are a set. OK, they sold me the set for $25 instead of $25 a piece. That is beds for 5 of my grandchildren. Oh, they had 4 automatic bread makers (with no owners manuals) for $10 a piece. Chat, chat, chat. I paid $5 for all 4 of them. (not $5 apiece). Went on the internet, downloaded the owners manual and baked a great loaf of bread.
      Can you say “great” for the Thrift stores?

      • WOW…..that’s ….”great”!! :+) We have one thriftstore here….there is no possibility of things like that coming in. More power to you John!!

  20. What I have been learning is that doing things and thinking like I was taught by those around me is no longer enough, true, or going to work no matter what happens. I have to use the best tool I have which is my brain such as it is. I have been “awakened” by this blog and others. It’s time to retool! The conditions around us are changing! Think the best, learn the best and don’t be fooled. Expect more from myself and give more of myself and enjoy the ride. Love others the best you can but realize the ride will be bumpy in the future!

    • im no expert but in an urban environment you will likely have limited maximum ranges but multiple ranges. given that i would suggest a shot gun, 12 gauge.

  21. Part of my preps include raising rabbits and chickens as a protein source. I would like to see information on growing food and storing preps to be able to support these types of animals.

  22. What small animal livestock would be best after the “bottom falls out”?
    Rabbit, chicken, ducks, geese, quail, goats?

    And where is John R.’s thrift store? (4th back previous entry)

    • Mike, I go to “Restore habitat for humanity”. There is so much donated, that if Habitat cant use it, it goes to the store. I also bought heavy duty nickel plated door hinges (all they had, two full boxes), the shelve brackets that have the hook under them for the closet rods, all for $.25 each. I also found the little cans, I am thinking sterno, that goes under the metal food trays to keep the food hot for catering services, for $.25 each. I took all they had, one box of 12. When you “wax” cheese, you need a small pan to melt your wax, that has to be dedicated to melting wax. She donated a small pan, because it was the only way to get me out of the store, so she could take care of “paying customers”. I felt like I had a license to steal.

          • John, I love my local Re-Store! They have gotten a little high on their prices, but I find some really cool stuff! Good for you for having a gold mine in yours!

          • Lori C. We have a Restore across the river in Evansville that is much larger and so are their prices. The store here in Henderson is much smaller but they will work with you on prices. The store in Evansville did work with me on the prices of the sliding glass doors, and these are what I built me greenhouse out of. $20 apiece.
            When looking for a door for my root cellar, Monday the Restore was closed. A young man drove in at the same time I did. I told him I was looking for a door and he told me the Salvation Army had just gotten in a couple. I went there. They had one that didn’t have hinges or a door knob. $20. I decided to buy it so I wouldn’t waste gasoline going back to Restore. All I had in my pocket, and all the change in my ashtray in the van, all I could come up with was $19.96. 4 cents shy. They would not come down 4 cents. Yes, I will remember them, and I’m so glad they didn’t. I went back to Restore the next day.

  23. My question would be, what is the best way to convince friends and family that they should prepare no matter what! They buy health, home and life insurance, so that’s prepping. Especially since we have seen so much violent weather, all over the country, in places not always expecting it.

  24. !) How to get family on board with prepping? 2) What happens when your family needs to bug out and you don’t have a retreat to bug out to? 3) How to stock up and store antibiotics?

  25. It is hard to narrow down one question to ask. I have chosen to move my family inland-we were in northern Virginia by the Potomac river- to within riding distance to a hospital-we have serious medical issues and I can attach a trailer to my bike to transport them to hospital- and far enough out in the country where we can grow our own food. But one problem really concerns me-Medication. My kid has to have it. He is allergic to Peanuts, Tree Nuts and Eggs. He also has seasonal allergies and is not a candidate for allergy shots. How much medication should I be storing? The epipens are quite expensive and are only good for so long stored optimally. To cap it all off, my husband is on medication for type 2 diabetes and a heart condition. So I want to make sure he has medication so he can function in the event of an emergency. This is my biggest challenge. Thank you.

  26. A question I would you like to see answered here is, as mentioned above, what the directions (with materials list) are to build a Faraday cage. With anyone and everyone being able to post online, I would appreciate having reliable information from a trusted source. This is too important not to get right! Thanks!

  27. I want some third grade…no second grade information on buying solar panels and how to use them. I know where to buy one but then what do I do with it. I don’t want to make one (yet)… What I really want to do is buy one and plug it in…

  28. I would like to know how to make a low cost water and air filtration system and how to install solar panels on low income budgets.

  29. aluminum box……or hardware cloth, for a Faraday Cage? I was thinking anything metal will interrupt a signal. A metal breadbox….in a pinch. A can upsidedown? Mylar?

  30. Folks, a Faraday cage is not as simple as a clothes dryer or a can upside down. It is a complete metal enclosure, with all seams sealed metal to metal. It’s not like sealing something from water or air. Rubber seals defeat the purpose of making an uninterrupted metallic container. It cannot have any wires leading into it, or from it. Any wires will act as an antenna and simply direct the charge into it. The items inside should be insulated from touching the metallic interior. Thin metallic containers (such as a Mylar bag) are not sufficient alone to dissipate the collected charge. Think of it like this, the static charge that builds up on our own body is enough to fry most electronic devices. The charge we are trying to protect against is millions of times stronger than that. The Faraday enclosure is made to collect that charge on the OUTSIDE of the container ONLY, so that what is inside will be unaffected.

      • Not simple to me at all. I’m just persistent when I want to learn the truth about something. I did online research, spoke to some master electricians, and used only verified information to base my results on. A true Faraday Enclosure is very simple, but also very specific in design.

  31. The hardware cloth….I’m not sure about, but it is metal. I know… use the cloth for a wallpaper inside of, say a closet? I’ll have to find out more….. Maybe I’m being too simplistic about this? I used to use a paint can to put my phone in. I have to research more….thinking I am missing something. How about the same envelopes that you keep your credit cards safe.

    • You are welcome. Took me months of researching to sort the truth from the assumptions on this one. There are tons of misinformation on this subject, and very little real info.

  32. I acquired envelopes for credit cards, passports, etc to keep my information out of nosey hands. Sooo, I thought, why not my cell phone? Well, ehhhh, wrong. I never thought about contact of the cell or whatever, with the metal container. The cloth came to me, while I was waiting on the road , talking to the traffic lady. Lots of long delays on our main hwy. because culverts are being replaced and new pavement set down. She said the cloth is really woven metal….and I thought ” ah ha”, and that’s all it took for my mind to go nuts on the idea. Also others told me things that were not …….complete. I’m glad I’m in Gaye’s site, and that’s all I have to say about that….for now. :+) Months huh…..I better get started.

  33. I use to drive a big truck. When we came to a weigh station, the station could weigh us driving down the road. (that’s what those big arms are hanging over the lane of traffic that we are directed to) If your weight is close to the limit, you have to come in to be weighed. If you are lots less, and you have a transponder in your truck, they signal you to pass. Each signal cost you $.75. If the weigh station is closed, they still charge you the $.75 to pass, but will send it back to you if you send them a letter stating the time and date of the charge. DUH. Send a letter with a $.40 stamp to get back $.75. As tight as I am, I would use the CB radio and ask the drivers going the other way if the weigh station was open of closed. If closed, I had a tin can that the Christmas fruit cake came in. I placed my transponder in it and placed the lid on, and I was never charged for driving by a closed weigh station. This made a faraday cage for my transponder, but I don’t know how well it would work in and EMP

    • What most people don’t understand is that radios, cell phones, and so on, do not operate on the same wavelength that an EMP burst would emit. You are blocking a radio signal with your cake tin, not an EMP burst. A radio signal is a different wave length, and a different level of radiation. The inside of a car can block a lot of different radio signals. But an EMP burst would wipe out all the electronics inside that car. To understand the workings of a Faraday Enclosure, you first need to stop equating an EMP burst to common radio waves.

  34. omg Michael…..just that alone, with no other crisis would cause worldwide chaos. Remember when the power went out for an extended few hours and there was no..tv? No internet……means life as most know it, will, come to a screecching HALT! Our whole way of conducting all commerce…..not to forget social lives. Not one weapon needed ……till then. holy moly

  35. I would like to see an article about getting healthy and fit – for those of us dealing with chronic illnesses and are pretty much pain medicine dependent. How can we turn life around (once we get an “ok” from our doctors, of course) when we’re 50+ and face the need to change our lives such that we can take care of ourselves in a survival situation and without pain meds (or even those who are taking anxiety meds or what have you to deal with life these days).

    I faced being without a prescription for the first time in 11 years – during which time I’ve never gone over the very lowest dose — it was only 30 hours or so but I was shocked to find myself in withdrawals. It was awful! So, with my refilled prescription, I put part of it away and dedicated myself to tapering gradually until I can get off of it. If we had an EMP or what have you – I would be more of a liability than a help to my family – I can’t have that. So, time to change!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.