Prepper Book Festival 8: Aftermath A Story of Survival

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This week’s author interview and book giveaway in the Backdoor Survival Prepper Book Festival 8 is singularly special not only because of the book itself, but because the author is a BDS frequent contributor, LeAnn Edmondson.

Her book, and the featured title this week. is Aftermath A Story of Survival. Imagine a computer virus that takes electronic systems around the world.  This type of cyber attack could happen on a small scale or a large scale but either way, it will change our way of life for a long, long time.  For some of us, those changes will outlive our lifetime.

Aftermath A Story of Survival Review & Giveaway - Backdoor Survival

I am preaching the choir when I say that survival fiction, including post-apocalyptic and dystopian fiction, gives us a window into what life may be like if our worst nightmares come true.  That is why we read it; so we can think through scenarios and anticipate how we might respond to unthinkable situations.  With that, I leave it up to you to imagine the horrors that will occur it technology fails us – forever.

You know the drill.  LeAnn has reserved a copy for one lucky reader. Enjoy the interview then be sure to check in below to learn about the giveaway.

An Interview with LeAnn Edmondson, Author of Aftermath

Tell me about your book. What is it about?

Aftermath begins with a catastrophic computer virus that takes down the systems we rely on in modern society across the entire globe.

It follows the main character, Jimmy Walker, as he makes it to his bug out location and how people band together to survive. Even though Jimmy was a ‘prepper,’ there are certain things you could not possibly be prepared for. No amount of food or water can prepare someone for the moral and ethical decisions you would have to face. The biggest threat to survival quickly changes from the elements to dealing with other people.

Not only does Jimmy and the group of people he banded together with have to face those who would take everything they have, there is the threat of the United Nations stepping in and assuming global authority. With the abolishment first of states and providences, and then countries themselves, the sense of community and belonging take on a whole new meaning.

What type of research did you have to do while writing your book?

I had to learn a lot about the state of Michigan for starters. Mike Kosinski is the one who actually started the story as a weekly serial on his site, TinHatRanch.com. When his schedule did not allow for him to keep it up, I offered to step in and take it over. Essentially, the bare bones of the story were handed over and I had to learn a lot about not only the geographical locations of towns and cities, I had to research weather patterns and temperatures for this part of the country that I had no knowledge of whatsoever.

The other areas of research included HAM radio call signs, military ranks, different styles of weapons and even a little psychology. It was important that the story was plausible and believable.

How long did it take to write?

The story was a weekly serial that allowed the readers to vote on how Jimmy would handle certain situations he found himself in. There were 30 weeks published that were then compiled and edited into the book.

It was the fans who suggested a book though I admit I had thought about it a couple times when I first took it over. It was their encouragement that made me go for it!  Overall, the process took a little less than a year.

Every book, fiction and non-fiction, includes a message. What message do you hope my readers will take with them after reading your book?

The single most important message I want the story to convey is that the world is not as wonderfully rose colored as it seems and that the slightest chink in the system could wreak havoc. It is not paranoia to have smoke alarms in your house, it is good sense. So is having some basic essentials set back just in case.

The secondary message is that even in the most horrific of circumstances, there are good people and hope out there. Never give up hope.

Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself?

I was born and raised in the temperate rainforests of Southeast Alaska. My husband and I are avid campers and are learning all we can to be more self-reliant. We enjoy living in a rural area and hope to move to a more remote island within the next few years on a piece of land we can homestead and live a subsistence lifestyle.

We don’t really care much about monetary wealth, we want life experience wealth!

As an author in the survival, prepping and/or homesteading niche, what are you personally preparing for?

There is no one thing. It’s just life! A sudden job loss, a break in the supply chain due to a natural disaster, or a man-made catastrophe. At least, I try to as best as I can. Our goal is to have a three month supply of food stocked up and learn how to provide a lot of our own food in the garden, forests, and ocean.

What would be your first prep-step if you were just getting started?

Defining what it was I really wanted to accomplish. “I want to be prepared” doesn’t do much good unless you know what it is you are trying to insure against. Being prepared for a nuclear bomb is a lot different than being prepared for a job loss or sudden medical issue.

What book or movie, fiction or non-fiction, do you think gives the best portrayal of what could happen?

Oddly enough, the one show I watched that really got me going was American Blackout the National Geographic channel. The absolute societal breakdown from just the power going out in the major cities was really scary. Even in areas that were more rural, people went crazy.

The vast majority of the people who live in the United States aren’t starving. They haven’t had to go more than a day or two (at most) without food, running water, and readily available heat. When you take those three things away, panic leads to irrational and desperate people who do things they never thought they would. And feeling justified in doing so.

Do you have plans for another book?

Yes. The sequel is already in the works and is being done as a weekly serial on HomesteadDreamer.com and I am happy to report that the story of Jimmy, Amie, and Captain will be a trilogy!

Readers are encouraged to vote and help shape the story. I believe that it is the involvement of the readers that adds the color and spice to the overall story. It makes it more relatable and ‘human.’ Plus, it is a blast to write!

The Giveaway

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The deadline is 6:00 PM Pacific next Tuesday with the winner notified by email and announced on the Rafflecopter in the article.  Please note that the winner must claim their book within 48 hours or an alternate will be selected.

The Final Word

Each week as I write about these books, I speculate as to whether something catastrophic such as a cyber-attack (or globally destructive computer virus), could really occur.  Unlike Marty McFly, I do not have a DeLorean that will project me into the future so I can see for myself.  Sometimes, no, oftentimes, just thinking about the possibility makes my head hurt.

That said, I keep on reading and keep on prepping.  I soldier through, hope nothing happens, attempt to educate the world about the merits of being prepared.

Enough doom and gloom!  Good luck in the giveaway!

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!
Gaye

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Spotlight:  Aftermath: A Story of Survival

When the picture of a dog taking a dump shows up on every computer and cell phone screen with the words, “IT Happens,” Jimmy Walker knew things would never be the same again. What he didn’t know was just how bad it would be.

Bugging out to his cabin in the Manistee National Forest, Jimmy figured he would ride out the storm there. He knew there would be trouble from the criminal element and those who had not prepared but hadn’t counted on the United Nations moving in and gathering people up to be ‘relocated,’ too. Banding together with others in the valley, Jimmy works to meet the threats that seem to come from all directions at once.

Bargain Bin:  For your convenience, here is a list of all of the books in the current Backdoor Survival Prepper Book Festival as well as a link to the books mentioned by today’s author.

Prepper Book Festival 8 – Non-Fiction

Tools for Survival: What You Need to Survive When You’re on Your Own
The Organic Canner
The NEW 2000-Hour Flashlight
The Garden Pool – Feed Your Family From Your Backyard Ecosystem
Survival Savvy Family: How to Be Your Best During the Absolute Worst
Doctor Prepper’s Making the Best of Basics Family Preparedness Handbook – Version 12.5
The Prepper’s Financial Guide
Saving Jimani: Life and Death in the Haiti Earthquake
The Age of Earthquakes: A Guide to the Extreme Present
Practical Prepping: No Apocalypse Required: An Everyday Approach to Disaster Preparedness

Prepper Book Festival 8 – Fiction

After the Crumble (Volume 1)
A Time to Endure (Strengthen What Remains)
Aftermath: A Story of Survival
Resurrecting Home: A Novel (The Survivalist Series)
Game Changer

Plus: The Preppers Guide to Food Storage

No list of books would be complete without my own book, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage.  The eBook is only 99 cent plus the print version is available for less than $6.00.

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Comments

Prepper Book Festival 8: Aftermath A Story of Survival — 59 Comments

  1. Just want to say I would love to win this book. I learn even more from survival fiction than from handbooks. I believe that the fictional exercise of positing a disaster and developing characters to react to it is never a waste of time and makes for great mental prepping.

    Now for the question. I would not communicate with the world. I would communicate with my neighbors. The goal would be to plant seeds if it’s not the dead of winter, set up town perimeter defense, hunt, gather, and fish. And of course live off preps. If the small town could be brought together, I would share my preps with those who are contributing, even though it would mean they are quickly reduced.

  2. Hello, I plan on communicating with the world via Ham Radio. Started the process in the spring 2013 with my Tech, then late summer passing the General and in the spring of ’14 passed the Extra. My daughter passed the Tech at 10yrs old in 2013 so no one should be fearful of the process. I don’t have heavy science backround and of course a 10yr old wouldn’t. Ham Radio is the ideal way to communicate in an SHTF situation. Ham radio folks are masters at taking older, used, components, of discarded equipment and making it work together. Also Ham Radio offers complete freedom, if the internet is down power up your radio. Oh, get involved with a local radio club, you’ll need the help to get going and you’ll have fun learning.

  3. I have read a lot about Ham radio being a great way to communicate during a catastrophic event, but I have not been able to devote any time to it. if only the internet was down we would be relying on cell phones though they are so integrated with computers and Internet that it is doubtful they would be very reliable.

  4. Have enjoyed all the information about Ham Radio from your web site and from others of late. I am looking into the possibility of obtaining a radio and license. Glad that you and hubby passed yours and would like to join you. This book sounds very good, hope to read it and thanks for sharing and spending so much time preparing us! Have a wonderful day and Keep Looking UP

  5. I love reading prepper fiction. As you stated, it allows me to think through the scenario and compare it to what I have, need, or need to learn.

  6. We have walkie talkies set aside. Kids will go nuts without Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat.They’ll actually has to speak with humans! Let hope this scenario never happens.

  7. I haven’t read her book yet but like the way the book came about. Will definitely visit her web site. But will wait to visit after I read the first book!

  8. I’m not really sure. Walkie Talkies or Ham Radios, even as inexpensive as some of them are, are just not in our budget right now. I read and enjoyed a number of the stories on Tin Hat Ranch, but just never seemed to keep up with it.

  9. I wont be able to unless I get HAM licence I suppose. I have supposed good walkie talkies but they do not go at all far like they say they do,literraly 1 block due to the houses blocking signal. If your in flat desert it would go the 30 miles or so, but most of us are not in flat land w/o house around!

  10. I would love to win this being from Michigan but to answer your question. I am working on trying to acquire a HAM radio and have my siblings get them too. We are scattered across the country and IF the grid goes down our cell phones will be useless. If the Mail service is still running then(Pony Express?), I guess the younger generation may have to learn how to write actual letters 😉 to communicate

  11. Communication is definitely a concern of mine. We do have walkie-talkies, but how far will that get us? I have been thinking about learning/getting licensed for ham radios. Now that my kids are going out on their own, I think that is something I will start looking into.

  12. I’m considering the idea of becoming a ham radio operator, but it’s still a bit far down on the “to-do” list. Alternative is to find a current operator, but haven’t yet.

  13. I’d communicate through HAM radio. Otherwise, when things settle back down, maybe a postal-type system will come back online. I hate to reference the Kevin Costner movie, Postman, but there are some tangible applications there.

  14. Gaye, Congrats on getting your license. I have had my tech license for about 1 year now and as soon as I graduate with my architecture degree (May 15) I plan on going for my general.
    I agree that the inexpensive Baofeng/Pofung radios are an ideal way to get into the hobby which will become a necessity in a grid down event. I really want to get a good base station and the internet IRLP program setup but that will have to wait.
    Again congrats.

  15. If there was a total crash, Internet and all, I wouldn’t worry about communicating with the world. I’d work with my neighbors to try to keep a handle on what’s going on locally, and do a lot of praying…

  16. I have a hand crank/battery/am/fm radio and intend to pick up a Baofeng radio. I have a friend who is a member of our local radio community who will help me set it up. That is a small start…

  17. I don’t really know. I guess walkie talkies with neighbors and immediate family since they can only be used within a short distance, and I would love to get a ham radios license, then I would use a ham radio

  18. Other than a hand cranked radio, I doubt we would be able to communicated with anyone outside our immediate area.

  19. We have ham radios but as of right now my son in the only one that is licensed. I play to get my tech license this summer.

  20. I think novels can provide better information than some nonfiction books. novelists imagine more and different situations and I can learn from them. Thank you for having the
    drawing.

  21. I guess walkie talkies. Does anybody know if they come in sets larger than 2, like 3 or 4? From reading the posts, looks like Ham is eventually the way to go.

  22. I have my General Class ham license. I also have a 2 meter mobile (currently setup as a base station) and a handheld. In addition I have a HF transceiver that I hope isn’t taken out be an EMP! 2 Meter would be used for local communications and the HF for shortwave listening or long distance communications.

  23. I love reading prepper fiction. It makes you think more about different situations and what to do. We have a small group of prepper friends and family ,with in a 15 mile radius, that will come together if anything happens.

  24. If I was at home I would walk/run to the neighborhood police station, which is two blocks away. I also have a fire station within walking distance I could use. I live on a bus line but wouldn’t depend on that. It’s an option though when I can’t get to my car to get out.

  25. i know nothing at all about ham radio should be something i need to learn and soon .i will have to read the book aftermath i love reading these thanks for all the info you give love your blog and fb page

  26. I’m not very good at listing reasons why I should be the person to win this book. My brain just works in a straight forward manner. Point A to point B as simply as possible! I read just about any “prepping” story I can find and I would love to read yours. Thank you for offering it to one lucky reader!

  27. I have been a member of CERT going on 8 years. Every class that I can attend, I’ll be there; there are classes that I teach as well. I really like teaching the Polaris class. Not only the instructional aspect with a power point presentation but the actually training on the vehicle.

  28. We have maintained a landline, have two cell phones that are not smart phones, and we have walkie talkies. We have an old CB radio that could perhaps be utilized (guess we ought to check that out!)

  29. Hi Gaye,

    This is a general comment. Recently, it has been much more difficult to read things on Backdoor Survival. Sometimes I freeze up, and other times it is just really slow reading. It seems that it has something maybe to do with the ads on the right hand side. I think it’s because some of them are flashing instead of static ads. I just know that I haven’t always had this problem. I’ve waited awhile to comment and I’ve also experienced it on two different computers.

    I really enjoy the site and would like to not be having this problem. Am I the only one?

    Thanks.

  30. I like to read about prepper fiction especially when the scenarios are realistic. Keeps me thinking about what mindset to have if a disaster did happen. Also gives me good ideas.

  31. It seems that Ham radio will be the best method of communicating which scares me a little since I am such an electronics-idiot. I’m trying to talk other family members into checking in to it since they may be better equipped to get a license than I would be.

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